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Paradise Found: Mac Creates an Eco Buffer Zone

McMaster student's weekly newspaper the Silhouette published this article on Lot M today:

Paradise found: Mac creates an eco buffer zone. (click on link to read article)

Coming soon to a riparian zone near you!
One part of the otherwise good article stands to be corrected. I'm not sure if I misspoke or if the writer got it wrong, but whatever the case, let me amend this line (as it appeared in the SIL)
“You’re kind of left in this one-way vacuum where you don’t get anything back. It goes into this black hole of administration,” he said of his early attempts to get the attention of the President’s Advisory Committee. “I could see that being a barrier, for citizens and other interested people around the campus to get involved.”
The quote is correct, but I was referring to the University Planning Committee (UPC), not to the President's Advisory Committee (PAC) without whose help this battle would still be waging. The UPC does not acknowledge receipt of correspondence, nor reply to follow-up e-mail requests to see if they actually received the correspondence. Of two letters sent to the UPC by Restore Cootes (March 2011 and March 2012) the first letter get a response in May (out of the blue, as it were) and the second, nothing at all.

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