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Showing posts from May, 2010

Isolation or built into the fabric of a city?

Is Dundas more of a "cycling town" than Hamilton? Not sure I'd buy that, but regardless of the designation, the idea that NCC's Andrew Iler puts forth that "the Dundas location does not create barriers to use that exist at the planned west Harbour site" is very arguable.

His reason against the west harbour site:“An urban core deadlocked by big urban streets is not ideal,” he said.We see, I suspect, a suburban bias in this decision from the NCC. How else does an urban core become a liability? It means being closer to more potential users of the facility, based on urban density, with decent public transit available.

Other benefits of an urban location would be spinoff improvements to the "big urban streets" that could then sport bike lanes and wider sidewalks and the development of other urban commercial, retail and other amenities. Same can't be said for the Dundas site which is isolated and accessible primarily, if not exclusively, by car. I…

footpath or cycle path?

"The NCCH believes the Dundas site would best serve three of the four cycling disciplines as it is close to road cycling routes and mountain biking trails."
What trails are they referring to? RBG trails? Bruce Trail? Neither of which are open for cycling, being footpaths in naturally sensitive areas? Or do they consider Dundas Valley trails close? How well thought out is this plan?

Cycling centre rejects harbourTheSpec.com - Local - Cycling centre rejects harbour
John Kernaghan, The Hamilton Spectator, (May 13, 2010)

Hamilton's cycling centre has joined the Tiger-Cats in rejecting the west harbour. But unlike the Ticats, the centre has firmly identified another Pan Am Games location.Andrew Iler, president of the National Cycling Centre Hamilton (NCCH), said almost four years of study have led the centre's board to conclude Olympic Park in Dundas would provide the best chance for the cycling track to be sustainable in the long term."We've invested subst…

Rationale for Velodrome Site Hits the wall

Early rationale (Nov. 1/08) for siting the velodrome in Hamilton:
"He said that local expertise and the efficiency of shared facilities at a stadium/velodrome were the underlying logic to the twinning.He pointed to office space, athletes services and sportsmedicine expertise that could be shared if cycling, track and field, soccer and football were located together."
Pan Am velodrome?TheSpec.com - Sports - Pan Am velodrome?Local bid organizers pitch cycling centre for 2015 games

John Kernaghan
The Hamilton Spectator

(Nov 1, 2008) Hamilton's 2015 Pan Am Games wish list is growing longer with a cycling velodrome that would be twinned with a stadium.A 3,000- to 5,000-seat indoor facility costing about $20 million could make Steeltown the big wheel of track events in eastern Canada and the United States.Tourism Hamilton's David Adames said he expects a feasibility study to conclude erecting Canada's only international standard track will also provide lots of …

no place for no plan

The East end of Dundas has had a beautiful and sustainable vision presented as a possible future, but people keep lobbing new and incompatible projects into the area. Will we really want more parking lots in the area of the historical Desjardin's Canal, and Cootes Paradise/West Pond and Royal Botanical Gardens land for this Velodrome?

"Who's going to argue with that"? I guess me, for one...

Dundas velodrome has support 2 councillors like ideaTheSpec.com - Local - Dundas velodrome has support 2 councillors like idea
John Kernaghan, The Hamilton Spectator, (May 15, 2010)

A proposal to move the Pan Am velodrome to Dundas has provisional backing by two city councillors.Terry Whitehead and Russ Powers say the idea of shifting the $11.4-million indoor cycling track could help resolve the dispute with the Ticats over the city's west harbour site.Meantime, a Dundas soccer official was surprised to read the area could lose a playing field at Olympic Park to the velodro…

longnose return to cootes

some good signs from the fish barrier...
Kaz Novak, the Hamilton Spectator No crocs at CootesTheSpec.com - Local - No crocs at Cootes But American eel and longnose gar mark two firsts

Eric McGuinness
The Hamilton Spectator

(May 7, 2010) An American eel and longnose gar mark two firsts at the Cootes Paradise Fishway this spring, but Royal Botanical Gardens staff report no sightings of either crocodiles or alligators.Tys Theysmeyer, head of conservation at the RBG, said the eel, an endangered species once abundant in Lake Ontario, is the first caught since 1997, when the fishway began operating to keep destructive carp out of the Cootes marsh at the far west end of Lake Ontario.He said it might be one of 144,000 released into the St. Lawrence River in a 2006 restocking effort. Eels are small enough to swim through the fish barrier, so it was just chance it was caught in one of the steel baskets used to sort carp from desirable species allowed into Cootes to spawn.Longnose gar is …

finding earth beneath the asphalt

The former Central Park elementary school ground in Dundas has been undergoing some positive alterations to its play areas, with the removal of some asphalt to create space for nature (in this case, trees).

Restoration like this helps us reconnect with the earth, and just as importantly, allows the earth to restore the connection to natural life cycles - rain can be absorbed into the earth, trees do their oxygen thing, and children at this now Montessori school get a better understanding of the connectedness that underlies our ability to thrive on this planet.

Do you know of a place that has removed pavement to make room for nature in this area? Do you want to get help to depave some property? Please get in touch with us!