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Design for nature not cars in McMaster west campus

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In the beginning

I've sometimes wondered how certain plants started growing in our yard. I'm guessing seed dispersal: the wind floats some through the air, sticky burrs caught on a racoon's fur drop as they pass through at night, a nuthatch drops some seeds from its tail-end while searching for bugs on the side of a tree.

The methods of delivery are varied, but the process of growth continues with time and the right conditions - rain, sun, soil -  and the wind, the racoon, the nuthatch are forgotten like the seed itself.

We see goldenrod, sumach, dogwood, and it appears as though nothing preceded this moment, this forest stands inexplicably before our eyes.

This is the way too with social or environmental change. Generations of germination and growth. The fruits may come after the planter has long disappeared. Like a monarch butterfly migrating - it's the generation that begins the journey that makes it possible for the next generation to arrive.

I feel a little of this with the west c…

Free Outdoor Workshops and Guided Butterfly and Moth Identification walks

No need to leave town to see beautiful butterflies and magnificent moths. Free, outdoor, and close to home at the Dundas, Ontario Urquhart Butterfly Garden. 
It is easy to get to without a car, you can ride your bike down the Cootes Drive multi-use path or take transit (HSR Dundas #52, Head Street) and get off by the Canadian Tire/Beer Store.

Survey on Cootes Paradise

Can you take a few minutes to help researchers at the University of Toronto with a survey on Cootes Paradise? 
Which environmental benefits are most important to you and your family? Your input will make a difference! 

Take the survey at: www.cpsurvey.ga
Please note that Restore Cootes is not involved in the research, and we are sharing to help promote the survey only.

Filling In The Floodplain

I'm stepping in to fill-in for the injured Wayne Terryberry on this interpretive hike - on the filled-in floodplain of lower Ancaster Creek, formerly Coldspring Valley Nature sanctuary,  currently McMaster Parking Lot M - also the site of a rehabilitation project that has peeled back the asphalt to create a 30 metre riparian zone to separate the cold-water creek from the parking.

Lots to see and discuss, and this hike will have a lot more about the natural science of the space with McMaster Biology prof Susan Dudley.

Moving toward MacMarsh at McMaster

Some interesting approaches to looking at rehabilitating a McMaster parking lot to become a coldwater wetland.

I'll be on the panel discussing the historical aspects of the site, with other smarter people, 10am Thursday, October 25, 2018.

Two days prior, Patricia Johanson will be speaking about the way she uses art, site-specific art, to help heal the earth.

Should be inspiring. Hope you can make it.

History Hike in West Campus Tuesday, September 11 at 2pm

We're going on a hike to introduce McMaster students (and any other interested participants) to this former RBG Coldspring Valley Nature Sanctuary and coldwater creek floodplain  - currently a parking lot - to examine the past, present and future of this place that is undergoing an important ecological transformation.
Tour Leaders Dan Coleman (English Professor and author of Yardwork: A Biography of an Urban Place)Randy Kay (Restore Cootes)Judy Major-Girardin (School of the Arts)