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Showing posts from 2018

McMaster Versus Maria's Walk

It seems that McMaster can't quite figure out a welcoming approach to this historical trail.  Signs have gone from "no trespassing" to "use at own risk" and now, "do not use" with the unwelcome addition of a chain link fence at the top and the bottom of the west campus trail.
Why all the changes from threatening to personal responsibility, and now back to prohibitive with physical barriers? 


Selected linkshttp://www.restore-cootes.org/2013/05/marias-blocked-walk.htmlhttp://www.restore-cootes.org/2015/01/re-open-and-repair-marias-walk.htmlhttp://www.restore-cootes.org/2017/07/lost-nature-trail-at-mcmaster-video.htmlhttp://www.restore-cootes.org/2014/12/who-was-maria.htmlhttp://www.restore-cootes.org/2015/05/trail-fragment-rim-prospect-circuit-to.html

Turtle Trouble on World Turtle Day

A new virus infecting the local turtle population, road mortality as cars and trucks continue their shell-crushing trips down Cootes Drive.

Yes, it's WORLD TURTLE DAYand things are admittedly pretty bad for our slow-moving reptile friends.

That means it's time to make some changes!
Why not start with things we can easily control, like our own behaviour. Driving along Cootes?

Pledge now to use an alternate route
(click on the link above to take the pledge!)
A minute or two will save lives!





Dundas Waste Water making fish sluggish in Cootes Paradise

Chemicals in Cootes Paradise are making fish sluggish Study says fish are burning energy to deal with effluent from treatment plant instead of on feeding, mating by Mark McNeil, Hamilton Spectator
If you've ever noticed fish looking unusually tuckered out in the waters of Cootes Paradise, a new McMaster study might have an explanation.

It seems effluent from the Dundas Wastewater Treatment Plant could be the cause.

The study published this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology says wild sunfish downstream from the plant expended 30 per cent of their energy to push back the onslaught of chemicals. That means less stamina for other things like finding food and a mate.

"The main thing we found is that the exposure essentially required the fish to burn a lot more energy," said Graham Scott, senior author of the research paper.

A lot of chemicals — including pharmaceuticals — just pass through the treatment plants into receiving waters. Exposed fish will h…

Freeze Frame

Deep freeze, thaw, deep freeze. Here we are in January 2018. Cootes is looking good no matter the weather!