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Pollinators Great & Small: Making the Community a Pollinator Haven: Dr. Peter Kevan & Dr. Vernon Thomas, Saturday Aug 29

Pollinators Great & Small: Making the Community a Pollinator Haven: Dr. Peter Kevan & Dr. Vernon Thomas, Saturday Aug 29, 11am

The Urquhart Butterfly Garden is excited to announce a free workshop held in the Garden, “Pollinators Great & Small: Making the Community a Pollinator Haven” led by pollinator and pollination biology experts Dr. Peter Kevan and Dr. Vernon Thomas. The workshop will take place on Saturday August 29 at 11am.

Peter Kevan and Vernon Thomas, accomplished professors from the University of Guelph, will share valuable information about the essential work of pollinators. They will discuss the numerous types of pollinators, their contribution to agriculture, the threats they face, and more.

Learn why it is important for the whole community to be committed to pollinator projects, and find out what an individual can do, without even owning a window box!

The garden is bustling with pollinators, flying to and fro - don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to see and learn all about the vitally important pollinators from two of the world’s leading experts.
 
This workshop will be a powerpoint presentation and talk held inside the Airforce Club, adjacent to the Butterfly Garden,  plus a brief walk through the Garden.

For more information about the Urquhart Butterfly Garden please visit:
http://urquhartbutterfly.com 

The Summer Series is funded by the Dougher Fund of the Hamilton Community Foundation.
_________________________________________
Contact:
Joanna Chapman – Coordinator, Urquhart Butterfly Garden
Phone: 905 627-8917
email: jchapman@295.ca
Website:  http://urquhartbutterfly.com

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