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Busy? What Peak Parking Looks Like at McMaster

According to Parking Services at McMaster, the busiest time for parking demand on campus is Tuesdays at around 1:00 pm. Stats provided by Parking show a demand for 2,803 spaces out of a campus supply of almost 4,000 spaces.

Having access to real time data would be helpful (and an app that showed drivers where the available lot capacity was would be kind of neat, along with a revamped parking fee structure to allow more flexibility and time of day pricing, etc, but that's another day)

I happened to be in the west campus already, realized it was the busy parking time, so I rode around on my bike snapping photos on my iPod touch. Here's some of what I saw that indicates the lot (at peak) has excess capacity:

Ward Avenue Lot 12:45pm
Lot G 1:00pm

Underground 1:03pm
Lot H 1:10pm

Lot M (a) 12:21pm

Lot M (b) 12:22pm
Much still needs to happen if we are to reduce parking demand, but to a large degree, it's happening without us. Just take a look around and see for yourself.

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