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OMB; OMG!

Owner files OMB appeal
Council rejects plan for storage facility near Olympic

Craig Campbell, Dundas Stars News Staff
Published on May 08, 2009

No mediation meetings or hearing dates have been scheduled in the Ontario Municipal Board appeal of city council’s decision to reject applications for a storage facillity development on King Street East.

Karen Kotzen of the OMB confirmed the appeal from property owner Doug Hammond, through the City of Hamilton, on April 23.

Councillors on the city’s planning committee and the full city council both unanimously rejected the application to construct four storage buildings on 201 King St. E. at Olympic Drive, within the Cootes Paradise environmentally significant area.

Councillors rejected a planning staff recommendation to support the rezoning and official plan ammendment applications because of concerns about the report’s accuracy and completeness, and extensive public opposition.

Submissions from some commenting agencies were not included or considered in the staff report. Although a public meeting was delayed in anticipation of new information, the findings of the Cootes to Escarpment Land Management plan were not mentioned in the staff report.

Several organizations, including the Hamilton Conservation Authority, Royal Botanical Gardens and Bay Area Restoration Council raised objections or concerns not included in the staff report.

http://www.dundasstarnews.com/news/article/173618

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