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counting the dead

1999 List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 21 - September 9

Birds 41
Unid. Birds 10
American Goldfinch 5
European Starling 5
Cedar Waxwing 3
Yellow Warbler 3
American Robin 2
Grey Catbird 2
Northern Cardinal 2
Northern Flicker 2
Ring-Billed Gull 2
Song Sparrow 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
House Sparrow 1
Swamp Sparrow 1

2001* List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 27- September

Birds 31
Unid. Birds 7
European Starling 7
American Robin 4
Mallard 3
American Goldfinch 2
Canada Goose 2
Yellow Warbler 2
Grey Catbird 1
Song Sparrow 1
Ring-Billed Gull 1
Tree Swallow 1

1999 List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 21 - September 9

Herps 1338
American Toad 1159
Snapping Turtle 74
Unid. Frog 44
Northern Leopard Frog 17
Eastern Garter Snake 13
Midland Painted Turtle 11
Green Frog 7
Northern Brown Snake 6
Unid. Snake 4
Unid. Turtle 2
Blanding's Turtle 1

2001* List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 27- September

Herps 238
American Toad 120
Northern Leopard Frog 68
Midland Painted Turtle 21
Snapping Turtle 8
Unid. Frog 7
Eastern Garter Snake 6
Northern Brown Snake 5
Unid. Snake 2
Northern Watersnake 1

1999 List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 21 - September 9

Mammals etc. 19
Little Brown Bat 8
Shorttailed Shrew 5
Raccoon 2
Deer Mouse 1
Grey Squirrel 1
Eastern Chipmunk 1
Unid. Mammal 1
(Mink)

2001* List of Roadkill for Cootes Drive April 27- September

Mammals etc 40
Unid. Mammal 21
Unid. Rodent 5
Raccoon 3
Eastern Cottontail 2
Grey Squirrel 1
Eastern Chipmunk 1
Little Brown Bat 1
Meadow Vole 1
Norway Rat 1
Red Fox 1
Virginia Opossum 1
White-Tailed Deer 1

Statistics compiled by The Royal Botanical Gardens
* one of the major causes for less road-kill in 2001 was the closure of the west-bound lanes. Another big factor was the drought-like conditions experienced throughout the region which meant many fewer breeding amphibians.

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