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One more time, just to be clear: Nature first.

6.0 Conclusions and Recommendations

Based on the information presented on this report, it is recommended that the Maplewood Facility be demolished and the area naturalized for the following reasons:

1. The Maplewood facility is in need of $560,500 revenue for immediate upgrades due to its age and requirements to meet regulatory standards.

2. Due to its location on the end of steep winding gravel road with limited water service and on-site sewage system and no access to natural gas, the facilities annual operation and maintenance costs are high.

3. The return on investment if the required upgrades are implemented will be low or nonexistent. This will negatively impact the HCA budget and will also limit the attractiveness of the facility to a private operator.

4. Previous attempts to change the facility to another more financially stable operation under a private operator have met with substantial public opposition resulting in the withdrawal or denial of the changes.

5. The location of the facility is in the midst of one of the great natural assets in Hamilton, namely the Dundas Valley. Continued use of this facility means continued negative impact of the surrounding natural heritage area including but not limited to, silting of the Sulphur Creek, adverse effects on flora and fauna due to road maintenance and use.

http://www.conservationhamilton.ca/images/PDFs/MaplewoodStaffReport.pdf

There is a public meeting coming up at the Conservation Advisory Board on December 12, at 7:00pm at the HCA Headquarters 838 Mineral Springs Road (Ancaster) - there will be delegations, and a chance for public input. Come if you can!

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