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Driving dangers

Intersections and collisions.

Kaz Novak, The Hamilton Spectator
Cootes Drive is closed due to a collision between a fire truck and a sub compact at the corner of Olympic Dr.
One injured in firetruck crash
Cootes Drive at Olympic Drive closed


One person is in hospital and Cootes Drive is closed after an accident involving a car and a fire truck.

A Hamilton fire department pumper truck on its way to a Dundas call was westbound on Cootes when it collided with a car in the intersection at Olympic Drive. It’s not clear which had the right of way.

While it appears the pumper suffered little damage, the driver’s side of the small, four-door sedan was stove in from one wheel to the other.

The driver of the car was taken to hospital. Officials haven’t released the extent of that person’s injuries.

Traffic using the intersection was re-routed over King Street between Olympic and downtown Dundas until Hamilton police eventually closed Cootes Drive at Main Street West in Hamilton and East Street South in Dundas.

Comments

Unknown said…
updated news report:

Car, fire truck collide TheSpec.com - Local - Car, fire truck collide
Driver in hospital with non life-threatening injuries

John Burman
The Hamilton Spectator

(Jan 13, 2009)

A woman is in hospital with serious injuries after the car she was driving collided with a Hamilton fire truck on Cootes Drive yesterday.

The woman, who was the sole occupant of the small, four-door sedan, was taken to Hamilton General Hospital. Her injuries have been reported as non life-threatening.

She was making a left turn from Olympic Drive onto Cootes Drive when the collision occurred.

Hamilton police said the pumper truck was westbound on Cootes Drive, responding to a call concerning a gas leak in a house on Park Street in Dundas when the crash occurred at 9:15 a.m. in the intersection.

Exactly who had the right-of-way is still under investigation.

The Highway Traffic Act allows emergency vehicles to proceed through red lights after coming to a stop, provided they have all their emergency equipment activated.

Hamilton fire safety officer John Verbeek said members of the pumper's crew were not injured.

While it appeared the pumper sustained little damage, the driver's side of the sedan was pushed in from one wheel to the other.

Traffic was rerouted after police closed Cootes Drive at Main Street West in Hamilton and East Street South in Dundas.

jburman@thespec.com
Randy said…
Fire truck driver charged in crash TheSpec.com - News - Fire truck driver charged in crash
Woman sent to hospital

Jackson Hayes
A Hamilton firefighter has been charged after a crash that sent a woman to hospital.

The accident happened on Monday night as a fire truck, driven by the 49-year-old firefighter, sped westbound on Cootes Drive. The driver was charged with failing to stop at a red light.

The crew was responding to a call concerning a gas leak at a home in Dundas and had both lights and sirens wailing.

Hamilton police Sergeant Terri-Lynn Collings said a woman in a small sedan was turning onto Cootes from Olympic Drive when the collision occurred.

She was taken to Hamilton General Hospital with serious but non-life threatening injuries.

Police investigators spent the evening reviewing the evidence and decided the firefighter was at fault for the crash and have issued a ticket for failing to stop at a red light.

“They looked at the damage to the vehicles, the point of impact and used witness statements,” Collings said.

Hamilton fire safety officer John Verbeek said he could not comment because the case is before the court, but he did say there is a provision under the highway traffic act concerning emergency vehicles.

“They (emergency vehicles) must come to a complete stop and proceed with caution when it is clear,” he said. “And they have to have lights and sirens on.”

If convicted, the firefighter could face a fine. If he fights the ticket, Collings said he’ll have to appear in court.

jahayes@thespec.com
905-526-3283

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