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endangered requires more

An endangered species. We know where they are (crossing King Road), we know when they are most at risk (at night), and yet a "voluntary closure"of the threat is the best we can do?

The distance between people wrapped in their cars and these tiny creatures is too great for true empathy. How many will be run over by people who ignore the signs for the sake of convenience? Will road-kill statistics be kept? Will we be able to pinpoint a date when the last jefferson salamander was crushed beneath a car tire?

Burlington closing King Road at night for salamanders
BURLINGTON King Road will be closed Friday for three weeks to protect the endangered Jefferson Salamander.
The city has put in a voluntary closure, with signage, to try to prevent road kills as the salamanders begin their annual migration to breeding ponds to lay eggs.
Salamanders migrate at night in spring when the temperature rises above 4 C.
The closure begins Friday and continues until April 22. The city will post signs on King Road encouraging drivers to use Waterdown Road to detour.
The road will be closed daily between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. Only local access will be allowed.
“A voluntary closure is a good, temporary solution while the city, Conservation Halton and the Ministry of Natural Resources investigate a more permanent approach,” Ward 1 Councilor Rick Craven said in a statement.
The city says it will continue working with Conservation Halton to study the crossing of the Jefferson Salamander and continue to make plans for the long-term future of the road and how to protect the endangered salamander.
There had been concern there wasn’t enough time to prepare for the road closure with public announcements and signage to be able to shut off the road this spring.
The Hamilton Spectator


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